Earlier this month Power Electronics received a question about "How to measure PSRR of a linear regulator circuit that powers an oscillator for an ADC. How can I make this measurement using my oscilloscope?" We asked our expert in PSRR, Steve Sandler to weigh in on the subject (view his response here) and also encouraged readers to submit other questions they had about the space.


Below are the responses to the questions that Steve had time to answer.

question & answer

Reader

I've seen PSRR called power supply rejection ratio and also power supply ripple rejection. Which do you prefer? - Brian

 

Alex Lidow Dear Brian, 
I believe either is acceptable, but I personally prefer rejection ratio, since we're not only concerned with ripple, but the attenuation of all signals. Another aside is that some like to see this is a positive graph, and others like to see it as a negative graph. This is confusing to some, but I find either ok. It depends on whether we refer to it as rejection (a positive number) or as a gain which would be a negative number (hopefully).

Reader

Hi Steve,
Does PSRR affect other analog ICs other than LDOs? - Matt
 

Alex LidowDear Matt,
Yes, certainly. The PSRR issues I see most other than LDO's are opamps, voltage references and also ADC clocks.


green

Reader

Steve, 
What is the definition of PSRR? I am having a hard time understand the application - Regards, Tito

Alex LidowDear Tito,
This is Power Supply Rejection ratio, which is a measurement of the attenuation of signals from the power supply input to the device output.

green

Reader

Hello Steve,
How does power supply rejection ratio impact power supply performance? - Bill
 

Alex LidowDear Bill,
Poor PSRR generally results in noise not inside the power supply but the load. For example it increase opamp noise, voltage reference and ADC noise and circuit noise in general